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NBME 22 Answers

nbme22/Block 3/Question#20 (43.5 difficulty score)
A 43-year-old man is brought to the emergency ...
Fibularis (peroneus) brevis🔍
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 +4  upvote downvote
submitted by spow(24),

Of all the options listed, there are two that function in eversion of the foot (and would cause this patient pain): the fibularis brevis and fibularis tertius.

At this point, NBME expects us to have some super asinine knowledge, but here's why (I think) the answer is brevis and not tertius. The brevis muscle runs over the lateral malleolus and therefore directly over this fracture. The tertius takes a different route into the foot, since it arises from the medial fibula and so it runs anterior to the lat malleolus and wouldn't cross the fracture site.




 +3  upvote downvote
submitted by niboonsh(280),
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shTi ikln sha oogd ctruespi sa eerfnerec ogvoolsiwe-tlrsn.ittbe-l/eudpie-rown-geupgythpbco--eseothiuumlsnsispabianr//rwgte-rr-fbrosvl./itage/srih:


Though both peroneus brevis and tertius are foot evertors, peroneus tertius is an anterior compartment muscle, and peroneus brevis and longus are lateral compartment muscle.

+2/- apurva(44),


 +1  upvote downvote
submitted by dentist(40),

the Fibularis Brevis is the only pure foot eversion muscle listed here. Everting his foot would exacerbate his injury and cause him more pain at the fracture

imo contraction of any of these muscles would be painful in this scenario




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I ma ngrity ot igefur siht out mfro eht isnkl veddiop.r Cna omesoen lseape laxiepn teh itaalrno ebindh shit senqiout ?

p4p4y4  I believe it's that this muscle everts the foot + runs over the lateral malleolus .. But the phrasing on the question is odd +4  
angelaq11  I didn't actually know this one. I just ruled out everything except the fibularis muscles, and then to be quite honest, I think I had never heard before of the tertius one, so...I chose brevis. +6  
asharm10  @angelaq11 same here :D +  



 +0  upvote downvote
submitted by spow(24),

Of all the options listed, there are two that function in eversion of the foot (and would cause this patient pain): the fibularis brevis and fibularis tertius.

At this point, NBME expects us to have some super asinine knowledge, but here's why (I think) the answer is brevis and not tertius. The brevis muscle runs over the lateral malleolus and therefore directly over this fracture. The tertius takes a different route into the foot, since it arises from the medial fibula and so it runs anterior to the lat malleolus and wouldn't cross the fracture site.




 +0  upvote downvote
submitted by sweetmed(120),
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eerHs a dgoo aegmi lrrnaatosr-gl/-ihmseletlp/net/btec.olfeynpemacmal/:mtiut/mo/cao/twheasm