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submitted by hayayah(418),

Femfibrozil is a fibrate, used for lowering TG levels.

mousie  I also chose Gemfibrozil too because its the best TG lowering drug listed but I can see where there might be some red flags for this drug in the way they asked the question... 40 year old obese woman with some upper abdominal pain ..... HELLO GALL STONES which is a common adverse outcome of Fibrates. +2  
uslme123  Well I didn't wanna give a fat, forty, female, that smokes a fibrate. So a statin, for me, was the best next option. +2  
whoissaad  Used same reasoning to choose statins. Fibrates are the main drug of choice for hypertriglyceridemia but given her symptoms, statins made more sense. Why do they do this to us... +  
roaaaj  what a tricky question! there are multiple factors should be taken in consideration.. she has triglyceridemia which put her in risk of pancreatitis, and most importantly atherosclerotic disease, and all of that would outweigh the risk of giving her gallstone. +  


submitted by usmleuser007(127),

PPI side-effects: + increased risk for C. diff + Increased risk for resp infections + can cause hypomagnesia + decrease absorption of (Ca2+, Mg2+, & iron) + increased risk of osteoporotic hip fractures (d/t low serum calcium)

imnotarobotbut  That's not the right answer tho, the answer is the binding of PGE to it's receptor +  
tinydoc  Can someone explain to me why the PPi answer is wrong if it increases the risk of C Dif wouldnt that also cause severe diarrhea. PPIs make a lot more sense to be given to this patient in the first place. +1  
maxillarythirdmolar  Keep it simple, stupid. +  
roaaaj  @tinydoc You are correct about PPI increasing the risk of C. diff, but there was no history of antibiotic use. +  


submitted by mcl(220),

In case you wanna go super nerd and read about myelin, capacitance, and resistance, this guy does a good job.

nwinkelmann  This really helped me, at least the pictures did. Here's my interpretation of the pictures in not super scientific terms: capacitance is like the "capaciy" to keep ions close to the membrane. Myelin puts a barrier between the ions in the conductive environment (ECF or ICF) and the nerve membrane. The higher the capacitance, the closer the ions are to the membrane, so it's like the charge effect is "more potent" so harder to change the membrane potentia, whereas if the ions are farther from the membrane, the charge effect is "less potent" so easier to change the membrane potential and thus easier to depolarize. Thus, with myelin, there is decreased capacity of the ions to be close to the membrane, so in demyelinating conditions, the ions can be really close to the membrane, i.e. higher capacitance. +4  
sweetmed  this helped a lot! +  
roaaaj  Well explained! +