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It’s acute alcohol consumption so fatty change more likely. Cellular swelling indicates alcoholic hepatitis which requires chronic alcohol consumption (See FA 2019 pg 385). At least that’s the logic I used to pick fatty change.

seagull  Seems like fatty change would require more than 1 weekend. I choose swelling since it's reversible and seems like something with a quick onset. +11  
nc1992  I think it's just a bad question. It should be "on weekends" +5  
uslme123  https://webpath.med.utah.edu/LIVEHTML/LIVER145.html +1  
uslme123  So his hepatocytes aren't dying ( ballon degeneration ) vs just damaged/increased FA synthesis due to increased NADH/citrate +  
sympathetikey  @seagull I agree! +  
et-tu-bromocriptine  It's not in pathoma, but I have it written in (so he or Dr. Ryan may have mentioned it) - Alcoholic hepatitis is generally seen in binge drinkers WITH A LONG HISTORY OF CONSUMPTION. +  
linwanrun1357  Do NOT think the answer of this question is right. Cell swelling make more sense! +  


submitted by bobson150(3),

The wording of this question confused me. This is asking "which of these vessels is the high pressure system" right? So the high pressure superior rectal is causing increased pressure into the inferior rectal?

welpdedelp  Superior rectal comes from the inferior mesenteric vein which comes from the splenic vein --> portal veins Thus, this dude had cirrhosis so it would "back-up" into the superior rectal vein. FA 2018: p360 +5  
nc1992  Superior rectal not superior mesenteric. Took me a minute +  
hyperfukus  ugh am i ever gonna get these right EVER +2  
titanesxvi  why not the inferior mesenteric, since the superior rectal drains there +  
thomasburton  @titanesxvi think it is because question says direct which is why superior rectal +1  
lilyo  thomasburton, so are they asking what vessels do internal hemorrhoids directly drain into? The order is Superior rectal vein--> Inferior mesenteric vein--> portal vein. +  
thomasburton  Yes exactly, so they do eventually reach IMV but not 'directly' +  


submitted by iviax94(6),

I figured they were trying to get at the life expectancy of an RBC, but wouldn’t supplemental O2 technically replace the CO bound to RBCs? FA even mentions that CO binds competitively to RBCs, and isn’t that the whole point of giving hyperbaric/100% O2?

nc1992  First aid has a lot of errors +  
yotsubato  Thats not an error though. Thats the actual reason behind giving hyperbartic O2 for CO poisoning... +  


submitted by haliburton(85),

according to medbullets link ns ss RNA must carry RNA dependent RNA polymerase (so that is out).

also, according to medbullets there are very few ds RNA viruses, so "most likely" will be ss. Also, RNA-dependent DNA polymerase = Reverse Transcriptase. Since HIV is a ss ps RNA virus with RT, they've described an HIV cousin. not sure beyond this.

nc1992  negative stranded can't be read by a translator so it needs to be transcribed into + first. Only then can it be used for protein. + is basically mRNA already. There's only one double stranded RNA family as far as I know- Reovirus so no encephalitis +2  


submitted by seagull(433),

Why spontaneous? He's engaging in an active sport with an increased risk of Traumatic injury. So we really just assume hes not injured because the stem doesnt directly say he's injured? These questions lead to too many assumptions. (in my opinion)

nc1992  Spontaneous pneumothorax, as a condition, is significantly more likely than a traumatic pneumothorax from just about anything but a car crash (ok maybe if he was in a fight). The car crash or a stabbing is also more probable overall but there's no point in inferring something that isn't provided +  
nwinkelmann  I picked the traumatic injury also. After reading these comments I looked into it further. Traumatic pneumos occur because of blunt or penetrating chest trauma, and I found that the MCC form of blunt trauma (>70%) is motor vehicle acidents that cause significant trauma (i.e. rib fractures) or even blast trauma. Although it didn't say there were no chest wall fractures, at the same time it didn't indicate any rib fractures, which would be most like to cause the traumatic injury pneumo in the patient's case. +1  
drdoom  The stem makes no mention of trauma. +  
hyperfukus  i guess the issue is that you have to assume what they mean by "strongest predisposing risk factor for this patient's condition" I think this is dumb bc the answer is completely different based on what you consider this patient's "CONDITION" to be? either way he has a pneumothorax so if you wan to know what caused that its prob him being active or bumping into someone but if you consider the etiology of the pneumothorax then its the bleb and that is from him being a skinny dude/smoker i went to this b/c he's also only 5/10 that's not tall in my head they could have been nicer and made him 6'1 at least...also i feel like i saw a lot of q's back in the day when i first learned this with a presentation of the person like tripping or something dumb but they already had the bleb and then got the pneumothorax +