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 +0  (nbme24#13)

This is BS bc PSGN is like the only nephrotic/nephritic syndrome I thought I had down cold





Subcomments ...

Key words: "at this time" and "can be helpful"

The answer to this question isn't: great - now we're going to take him off the vent because you told us that's what he wanted.

nbmehelp  ^^^ exactly +  


Why is it not ovarian follicle cells? I thought the female analog of Sertoli and Leydig is theca/granulosa cells.

colonelred_  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen. +2  
brethren_md  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +1  
sympathetikey  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +1  
s1q3t3  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +1  
masonkingcobra  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +  
mcl  Wait, but did anyone mention that females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen??? +10  
mcl  But seriously though, pathology outlines says sertoli-leydig tumor "may be suspected clinically in a young patient presenting with a combination of virilization, elevated testosterone levels and ovarian / pelvic mass on imaging studies." As for follicle cell tumors, granulosa cell tumors usually occur in adults and would cause elevated levels of estrogens. Theca cell tumor would also primarily produce estrogens. Putting the links at the end since idk if they're gonna turn out right lol Link pathology outlines for sertoli leydig granulosa cell tumor theca cell tumor +6  
bigjimbo  LOL +  
fallenistand  Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen. +2  
medpsychosis  So after doing some intense research, UPtoDate, PubMed, an intense literature review on the topic I have come to the final conclusion that...... ...... ...... ...... Wait for it.... ..... ..... Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen. +3  
charcot_bouchard  Hello, i just want to add that Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +1  
giggidy  Hold up, so I'm confused - I read all the posts above but I still am unsure - are sertoli-leydig cells notorious for producing androgen? +1  
subclaviansteele  Hold the phone.....Females can get sertoli leydig cell tumors which are notorious for producing androgen? TIL TL;DR - Females can get sertoli leydig cell tumors = high androgens +  
cinnapie  I just found a recent study on PubMed saying "Females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen" +  
youssefa  Hahahahaha ya'll just bored +2  
water  Bored? you wouldn't think so if you knew that females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +  
nbmehelp  I dont get it +  
redvelvet  how don't you get it that females can get Sertoli Leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen? +  
drmomo  what if this means..... females can get Sertoli Leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +  
sunshinesweetheart  hahahaha this made my day #futurephysicians #lowkeyidiots +  
sunshinesweetheart  @medstruggle look up placental aromatase deficiency (p. 625 FA 2019), it would have a different presentation +  
deathbystep1  i am sure i would ace STEP 1 if i only knew that females can get sertoli-leydig cell tumors, which are notorious for producing lots of androgen +  
noplanb  Wait... I might actually never forget this now lol +  


submitted by mousie(83),

is this subacute endocarditis associated Membrano-proliferative GN?

jus2234  The question describes how he had a strep infection 15 days ago, and now this is poststreptococcal glomeruloneprhitis, which can also be described as proliferative glomerulonephritis +7  
seagull  The question would be too fair if it just said PSGN. Instead we need to smell our own farts first. +28  
yotsubato  And they used terminology NOT found in FA +5  
water  who said they were limited to FA? +1  
nbmehelp  FA uses the common nomenclature and the fact most of our other resources use the same nomenclature for this, I think we can agree that is is the accepted terms. If they're gonna decide not to use the nomenclature that most medical students are taught then they should provide their own study materials at that point for us to use. The test shouldn't be this convoluted for no reason. +1  


submitted by soph(16),

I think key here is they are investigating the hypothesis of ammount of arsenicin water increases RISK of cancer.... best way to measure risk is case control.

nbmehelp  If they were measuring risk shouldn't it be a cohort study though? By looking at first aid.. +1  
270onstep1  They both can determine risk. Key here is the time efficiency of case-control studies when compared to cohort. +  


submitted by dbg(26),

Did anyone else wonder WHAT "PULMONARY SYMPTOMS" is the question referring to?? There is literally not a single symptom mentioned in the whole vignette. No "crackles heard over both lung fields" are not symptoms. They are signs found by the physician.

Seriously doubting the whole NBME board test writers right now. Do they adequately revise their work? This is not the first technical mistake I realize on the new forms.

nbmehelp  Yup. Looking back its clear what they were trying to get at, but this definitely threw me off when I was taking the test bc I kept rereading the question looking for a specific symptom the pt had that they wanted me to explain. +1  


submitted by colonelred_(48),

The analysis only showed a mutation in one allele. CF is an autosomal recessive disease: the disease only manifests if there are mutations in both alleles of the CFTR gene.

If you still have 1 functional copy of the CFTR gene, you can still make the CFTR protein (the chloride channel/transporter), hence your body won’t have any issues.

This is analogous to tumor suppressor genes like Rb: so long as one of the alleles you have is functional, you can make enough of the protein to “make up” for the defective allele. If both get knocked out (Rb-/-), you lose the protection provided by the gene because now you make no protein at all.

The only thing that made sense for this question was the fact that the other allele was not included in the analysis.

charcot_bouchard  OR another allele has a diff type of mutation because CF is done by like hundreds of diff type of mutation. SO the 70 types that we screened covered one type from one parent but not another that was inherited from other parent. +4  
soph  I put D thinking there was a mutation in another protein that interacts with CFTR....thus u dont have CF but some disease with similar phenotype. Is this wrong bc its simply not the case ?? +  
nbmehelp  @charcot_bouchard I think that makes more sense if I understand what you're saying- Probably had a mutation only in 1 of 2 of the same alleles in the analysis but had another mutation in 2 of 2 alleles at a different location not included in the analysis, right? +  
fallot4logy  CF is a rare disease , and the possibility to have a mutated gene plus a gene that its not belong to 70 most common cf mutations is extremely rare +  


submitted by neonem(262),

NRTIs are the main HIV therapy drug that can cause bone marrow suppression (not as common with NNRTIs). This class includes zidovudine, didanosine, emtricitabine, lamivudine, stavudine, abacavir. Zidovudine is most known for this side effect.

Nelfinavir = protease inhibitor azithromycin = aminoglycoside (not really used for HIV) pentamidine = another antimicrobial, mostly used for pneumocystis I think? Lamivudine = another NRTI but less known for bone marrow suppression

adisdiadochokinetic  Azithromycin is a macrolide, not an aminoglycoside FYI, and its use in HIV is primarily as prophylaxis at very low CD4 counts for, among other things, the mycobacterium avium complex. +2  
nbmehelp  How would we have known to choose Zidovudine over Lamivudine tho +2  
mjmejora  @nbmehelp the sketchy with Princess Izolde (Zidovudine) eating bone marrow was my only tip off +2  
niboonsh  you have ero bone marrow if you take idovudine +  
niboonsh  the z's were supposed to be bold idk what happened. you have Zero bone marrow if you take Zidovudine +  


Can someone explain why does this patient have hypokalemia?

colonelred_  Catecholamines activate the Na/K pump, which will drive K inside. +5  
trazabone  Read online that catachelamines are released following tonic clonic seizures. Besides that, BP of 180/100 could indicate that catecholamines are circulating. +1  
fulminant_life  This mechanism is why giving albuterol for hyperkalemia works +3  
nbmehelp  Why does this guy have increased catecholamines tho +  
johnson  His SNS activity is seriously increased --> increased catecholamines. +  
nbmehelp  Why is his SNS activity increased? Is the BP literally the only hint? +  
youssefa  Alcohol withdrawal creates a hyper- catecholaminergic state + Seizures do that as well. +1  
water  My best guess is that withdrawal puts the body in a state of stress (same for seizures) and with stress you have release of catecholamine which we'll see in the BP and the hypokalemia. +  


Can someone explain why does this patient have hypokalemia?

colonelred_  Catecholamines activate the Na/K pump, which will drive K inside. +5  
trazabone  Read online that catachelamines are released following tonic clonic seizures. Besides that, BP of 180/100 could indicate that catecholamines are circulating. +1  
fulminant_life  This mechanism is why giving albuterol for hyperkalemia works +3  
nbmehelp  Why does this guy have increased catecholamines tho +  
johnson  His SNS activity is seriously increased --> increased catecholamines. +  
nbmehelp  Why is his SNS activity increased? Is the BP literally the only hint? +  
youssefa  Alcohol withdrawal creates a hyper- catecholaminergic state + Seizures do that as well. +1  
water  My best guess is that withdrawal puts the body in a state of stress (same for seizures) and with stress you have release of catecholamine which we'll see in the BP and the hypokalemia. +  


submitted by drachenx(7),

These kinds of questions are really hard because I've never seen female reproductive structures irl. :c

nbmehelp  Lmao +  


submitted by dbg(26),

Am I the only one who thought, my whole life, that it actually originates from the thyroid but just physically connected to the tongue

nbmehelp  same +2  


You know it’s an enveloped virus since it doesn’t hold up to acid or being dried. You know it causes a fever and a cough, while affecting the larynx. Only virus category that fits all that info is the coronavirus (causes SARS) from that list.

zelderonmorningstar  EBV doesn’t cause fever and cough? +  
zelderonmorningstar  Wow, just checked First Aid and it doesn’t list “cough” as a symptom of EBV. +1  
drdoom  EBV is not a “respiratory virus”; it’s a *B cell virus*. Even though you might associate it with the “upper respiratory tract” (=kissing disease), it doesn’t cause respiratory inflammation since that’s not its trope. B cells are its trope! That’s why EBV is implicated in Burkitt Lymphoma, hairy leukoplakia and other blood cancers. (EBV is also known as “lymphocryptovirus” -- it was originally discovered “hiding” in *lymphocytes* of monkeys.) So, EBV = think B cells. +9  
fulminant_life  EBV does cause pharyngeal and laryngeal inflammation along with fever, malaise, and cough and LAD. The only thing that pointed me away from mono and towards coronavirus was the patients age. +2  
nbmehelp  Can someone explain what not holding up to acid or being dried has to do with being enveloped? +  
yb_26  @nbmehelp, the envelope consists of phospholipids and glycoproteins => heat, acid, detergents, drying - all of that can dissolve the lipid bilayer membranes => viruses will loss their infectivity (because they need an envelope for two reasons - to protect them against host immune system, and to attach to host cells surface in order to infect them) +1